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The Stochastic Momentum Index (SMI): A Refined Indicator for Traders Improving Your Trading Performance with the Forecast Oscillator
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Stochastic: An Indicator for Predicting Market Trends

What is the Stochastic Indicator?

The Stochastic is a technical analysis tool first developed by George Lane in the 1950s. It is an oscillator-type indicator, which means that it oscillates between two extreme values, indicating whether the market is overbought or oversold. The Stochastic Indicator measures the market’s momentum by comparing a security’s closing price to its price range over a specified period.

Stochastic

The Stochastic Indicator consists of the %K and %D lines. The %K line is the main line and is calculated using the following formula:

%K = 100 * [(C – L5)/(H5 – L5)]

Where C is the closing price, L5 is the lowest low of the past five trading days, and H5 is the highest high of the past five trading days. The %D line is a moving average of the %K line and is usually set to a three-day period.

How Does the Stochastic Indicator Work?

The Stochastic works by comparing the current closing price of a security to its price range over a specified period. If the closing price is closer to the high end of the price range, the Stochastic Indicator will be higher, indicating that the market is overbought. If the closing price is closer to the low end of the price range, the Stochastic Indicator will be lower, indicating that the market is oversold.

The Stochastic Indicator also uses a signal line, a moving average of the %K line, to help traders identify potential buy and sell signals. When the %K line crosses above the signal line, it is considered a buy signal, indicating that the market is likely to experience a bullish movement. When the %K line crosses below the signal line, it is considered a sell signal, indicating that the market is likely to experience a bearish movement.

Using the Stochastic Indicator in Trading

Traders and investors use the Stochastic to identify overbought and oversold levels in the market, which can help them make informed trading decisions. When the Stochastic Indicator is above 80, it is considered overbought, and traders may look for opportunities to sell. Conversely, when the Stochastic Indicator is below 20, it is considered oversold, and traders may look for buying opportunities.

It’s important to note that traders should not use the Stochastic Indicator in isolation but combine it with other technical and fundamental analysis tools. Traders and investors should also be aware of the limitations of the Stochastic Indicator, as it can sometimes give false signals in choppy or sideways markets.

Incorporating Divergence into Stochastic Analysis

Divergence is a powerful concept that can be used with the Stochastic Indicator to provide even stronger trading signals. Divergence occurs when the price of a security moves in the opposite direction of an indicator, suggesting that the current trend may be weakening or reversing.

A bullish divergence occurs when the price of a security forms lower lows while the Stochastic Indicator forms higher lows. This suggests that the selling pressure is decreasing, and the market may be due for a bullish reversal. Conversely, a bearish divergence occurs when the price of a security forms higher highs while the Stochastic Indicator forms lower highs. This indicates that the buying pressure is weakening, and a bearish reversal may be imminent.

To incorporate divergence into your Stochastic analysis, look for discrepancies between the price action and the Stochastic Indicator. A Divergence can provide an early warning sign of a potential trend reversal, allowing traders to enter or exit positions before the market makes a significant move.

Using Stochastics with Different Timeframes

The Stochastic Indicator can be applied to various timeframes, from intraday to daily, weekly, and monthly charts. By analyzing multiple timeframes, traders can better understand the market’s momentum and identify potential trend reversals.

For short-term traders, such as day traders and scalpers, using the Stochastic Indicator on intraday charts can help identify quick entry and exit points. However, these shorter timeframes may generate more false signals and require more skill and experience to navigate effectively.

Longer-term traders, such as swing traders and investors, can use the Stochastic Indicator on daily, weekly, or monthly charts to identify potential trend reversals and support or resistance levels. These longer timeframes may provide more reliable signals but may not capture shorter-term price movements.

Example scanners and strategies that use Stochastic

The Stochastic Indicator can be used in both Scanning the market and Testing Strategies. To see how exactly it can be used in these ways, we provide the following samples. The scanner searches the market for stocks using this indicator, and the strategy tests buying and selling rules built around this indicator.

"*Stoch rsi cross < 20" scanner by Matthew Delao
charts.trendspider.com
“*Stoch rsi cross < 20” scanner by Matthew Delao
"Stochastic w/ 100SMA Strategy Strategy #Marketplace" strategy by TrendSpider
charts.trendspider.com
“Stochastic w/ 100SMA Strategy Strategy #Marketplace” strategy by TrendSpider

The Bottom Line

The Stochastic Indicator is a powerful tool for traders and investors looking to make informed decisions in the stock market. By measuring the market’s momentum and identifying overbought and oversold levels, the Stochastic Indicator can help traders identify potential buy and sell signals. However, traders should use it in conjunction with other analysis tools and with an understanding of its limitations. With the proper knowledge and strategy, the Stochastic Indicator can be a valuable tool in a trader’s arsenal.

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The Stochastic Momentum Index (SMI): A Refined Indicator for Traders Improving Your Trading Performance with the Forecast Oscillator